Lithuania may seem a little stuck in the past, but after all, it was the last country in Europe to convert to Christianity.

So when some urban explorers found an abandoned building just outside Vilnius, the capital, they came across what seemed to be some ancient and dark discoveries.

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Canadian explorer, Tyler Paduraru led the expedition as he had become interested in the eastern European country his girlfriend originated from.

 

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He had actually said that Lithuania was his “favorite place” in the region. However, perhaps after the vile discoveries he was going to make he might not have the same thoughts for the country.

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Shamanic traditions say that doors or tunnels can mark the threshold for the “otherworld”. For example, in Lewis Caroll’s famous Alice in Wonderland, she wandered through a mysterious rabbit hole. However, in some other magical practices, spiritual portals are lines of contact to demonic entities.

 

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After exploring the perimeter, Paduraru found an entry into the building. However, beyond the ‘rabbit hole’ he was definitely not going to find any Cheshire cats or Mad Hatters. It was in fact the polar opposite, the jagged hole led to a lonely, dark and dismal world.

 

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A crumbling tunnel stretched into darkness, Paduraru photographed his creepy findings for us to see.

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Upon entering the building, it became evident that Paduraru wasn’t the first to enter and explore its gloomy interior. The threatening graffiti scrawled on the wall above was just the tip of the iceberg, the true terror lay just ahead.

 

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Paduraru stumbled across the first of many unfathomable mysteries, which seemed to be a Catholic rosary necklace which had been taped to the wall. He couldn’t quite understand what the meaning of this was, however, a black handprint on the wall suggested a panicked visitor.

 

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On another wall, a prayer had been scribbled roughly, written in Lithuanian, it appeared to say, “Mes Esam, Bet Greitai Musy Nebebus. Amen.” And, translated into English, it seemed to speak of the coming of death: “We are, but soon we won’t be. Amen.”